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Author Topic:   Apollo crew insurance covers
4allmankind
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posted 03-15-2004 03:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 4allmankind   Click Here to Email 4allmankind     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Is there anyone on this forum that would consider themselves to have a working knowledge of the Apollo insurance covers? I would love to speak with one of you.

I believe I understand their purpose; what I would like to learn is more information about the "levels" of covers, how many for each mission were produced, what is the typical price range for each mission, which sets have not yet been made availalbe to the public etc. Things of that nature.

I have seen a few on the market recently for what I think are a great price but I fear that I may be looking at something other than what I believe to be an original insurance cover.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 03-16-2004 11:47 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
They started with Apollo 11 (three types) and continued on until the Apollo 16 lunar voyage, however, there were for various missions more than one type of insurance-type cover:
  • Apollo 12 (only one design, which by the way, was the first of the exclusive "astronaut pin" cachet design)
  • Apollo 13 (two types)
  • Apollo 14 (two types overall)
  • Apollo 15 (two main designs, but others done unofficially), and
  • Apollo 16 (only one).

Bob M
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posted 03-16-2004 01:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If you want to know about space covers, just ask Ken. His brief description of Apollo Insurance covers should be very helpful and give anyone a good over-view of these handsome, historical and very collectible gems. They are in a category all by themselves and even many collectors who ordinarily shun space covers, have interest in them.

4allmankind
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posted 03-17-2004 06:25 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 4allmankind   Click Here to Email 4allmankind     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I received a great email from Bob, it was quite informative and must have taken hours to write. He's given his permission to reprint it here.

Note: It has been edited a small amount (mainly prices). As we all know they are quite subjective.

Remember, these things were not done officially and were done mainly by a stamp club in Houston for each Apollo crew and were handled by that stamp club ("Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club," as seen on some of the "secondary" insurance covers) and then the astronaut families kept the covers while the mission was underway.

After they returned safely, the covers were stored away or dispersed in various ways and no "official" record was kept, especially by NASA, which, I guess, had really little or nothing to do with them. They may have given their official okay for the astronauts to create them, but they were just something that the astronaut crews did themselves with much help from the MSCSC.

You are probably confused and wondering about the MSCSC "secondary" insurance covers. These are absolutely insurance covers, but not of the most popular and well known type.

The Apollo 15 "secondary" insurance covers are certainly genuine, but because the cachets used on them were also available to collectors at that time, it's possible that some seen were canceled for the flight and then later signed by the crews - which, of course, would not make them insurance covers.

That's the problem with the secondary insurance covers: the cachets and covers are exactly identical to those that were actually created and used as insurance covers, but also were made available to space collectors and could have been signed after the mission.

But those Apollo 15's that come with a letter from Mrs. Irwin stating that they are insurance covers, ARE insurance covers and are certainly worth collecting.

The main insurance covers are unique, in that their cachet design (a crew patch/mission emblem cachet with various insignia at the bottom, such as Astronaut Wings) was used ONLY for insurance covers for Apollos 12 through 16 and not made available to collectors - generally. But there were a number left over and many were stamped and canceled but not signed.

As time went by many of these were sold and dispersed and some were later signed by one or more of the astronauts. But these are NOT insurance covers, as they were not signed by the crew, preflight, and put up to be sold in case the crew was lost.

These left over covers are generally referred to as "insurance-type" covers and pop up from time to time. I have obtained a few in the last two to three years and have had some of these canceled/unsigned insurance-type covers signed by various astronauts.

Numbers? Who knows? Probably at least 500+ for each mission would be in the ballpark. Ken could tell you better than I. But some flights had fewer done, with probably Apollo 13 and 16 the smallest number and Apollo 12 and 15 the most.

Probably Apollo 12 and 15 are seen the most and Apollo 11's and 13 the most expensive. Apollo 11's are expensive because of it being Apollo 11, but probably a fair number of Apollo 11s exist - I'm thinking that around 300+ were done for each family, but probably only a few hundred have been released.

Hope all this gives you a good background on Apollo insurance covers and I'd be glad to answer any other questions you may have. I am not an authority on insurance covers and what knowledge I have I mostly got from Ken Havekotte.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 03-18-2004 03:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Nicely done Bob, however let me add a few comments.

When NASA's Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club (MSCSC) approached Michael Collins about the possibility of providing the crew with Apollo 11 postal covers, it was decided by all the crewmembers to include — not just the club's own printed cachet envelope — but two other popular "on the market" so-to-speak cachet designs of Dow Unicover and the official mission patch, both of which, originated from the on-base Kennedy Space Center.

We know that 214, and perhaps more, were flown by the crew in lunar orbit and that Aldrin and Collins had reported earlier that "hundreds," or just about the same amount that were flown, were kept behind (all three cachet types) as the so-called first insurance or contingency covers.

To my knowledge, no one knows for sure of the exact quantity of covers that were purchased — at production cost — by the crewmembers that were signed and left behind. The Aldrin family had many (Joan for certain) as did the the Collins family.

Similar covers, all signed by the crew in advance before their moon-bound trip, have also surfaced that were in the possession of various personnel that worked exclusively inside the astronauts' personal or crew quarters while at KSC, and many with NO postal cancels!

It should be noted, for the record so-to-speak, that the MSCSC was only involved in their own stamp club printed cachet designs, contrary to what others may have believed.

An aerospace public relations specialist, after hearing about the Apollo 11 philatelic practices that originated from a Houston stamp club, wanted to do his own — and for the astronauts' exclusively and their families — a special cachet design that he also wanted direct involvement and control over. Thus, this is what created the first "insurance astronaut-insignia" cachet designs with various symbol(s) that were incorporated into the cachet design of high-quality rag content envelopes.

The special cachet covers were produced by a printing company in Cocoa, FL — not Houston — from, starting with Apollo 12, to Apollo 16. The astronaut-insignia covers, in fact, had nothing to to with the MSC Stamp Club, even though Apollo crews still maintained contact with them in signing and using (even flying some to the moon) their stamp-club cachets as another type of "insurance" cover.

Apparently, the Apollo 12 crew only used — for them personally — the non-MSCSC printed cachet that contained the Navy wings imprinted in gold ink below their crew patch design.

Both cover varieties — MSCSC and astro-insignia — were used by the Apollo 13, 14, and 15 crewmen. It should be noted, also, that all the astro-insignia cachet covers were produced, paid-for, and postmarked exclusively here on Florida's Space Coast with no MSCSC involvement whatsoever.

Bob M
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posted 03-18-2004 03:51 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Thanks, Ken, glad to get you involved in this. And a story you told me bears repeating here about Apollo 11 Insurance covers.

A box of covers — probably at least a hundred covers? — signed by Armstrong/Aldrin/Collins was stolen from the KSC Crew Quarters that were intended to be used as Insurance covers for Apollo 11. But no one knows what happened to them or if they were even canceled.

If they weren't canceled for the Apollo 11 launch, then if any uncanceled crew signed Apollo 11 covers appear, or canceled for an Apollo 11 anniversary, then they could be from the stolen box. It's a real mystery about what happened to these covers.

100 of them at $2,500 each would have a value of at least $250,000 at this time!

4allmankind
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posted 03-18-2004 04:38 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 4allmankind   Click Here to Email 4allmankind     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Great info guys. Could one of you post here why/why not any mention of any Apollo 17 insurance covers?

Ken Havekotte
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posted 03-19-2004 08:21 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by Bob M:
A box of covers - probably at least a hundred covers? - signed by Armstrong/Aldrin/Collins was stolen from the KSC Crew Quarters that were intended to be used as Insurance covers for Apollo 11.
As I recall hearing that Collins reported "a box" of autographed covers, which cachet type(s) — I don't think was ever known, was missing. Usually about 400-500 would fit in a shoebox-type, but I think Collins reported "hundreds" that were eventually missing from KSC crew quarters the week or so before their launch to the moon.

This, now, is a most interesting story since similar crew-signed covers have surfaced without no postal cancels, and, even some of the Apollo 11 cachet covers were autographed ON BACK of their surfaces with nothing on the front side, except for the cachet itself.

quote:
Originally posted by 4allmankind:
Could one of you post here why/why not any mention of any Apollo 17 ins covers?
In regards to the Apollo 17 crew, only one known-type of cachet cover was actually used by the crew for signing, however, mainly because of a prior cover "scandal," which I've always hated using that term for many reasons, there were no astro-insignia cachet covers produced as NASA and the astronauts wanted to distance themselves from any further "special" philatelic ties.

The same can be said of the MSC Stamp Club as well, however, printed club covers for Apollo 17 were signed by the crew before and after the lunar trip, apparently though, in small numbers and without any reference or tie to so-called "insurance or contingency" labels.

Larry McGlynn
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posted 03-19-2004 04:24 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Larry McGlynn   Click Here to Email Larry McGlynn     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I have an Apollo 17 emblem cachet cover on my website that I have always wondered about. It is crew signed. I know it is not an insurance cover, but it has an interesting imprint on it of a mouse in a space helmet. Do either of you gentlemen know the story behind the mouse?

astpexhibitor
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posted 03-19-2004 04:39 PM           Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Larry, as far as I can recollect, the mouse cachet commemorated an experiment that was aboard Apollo 17 involving a mouse.

According to the Apollo 17 Preliminary Science Report, an experiment titled Biocore Experiment (biological cosmic ray experiment) was conducted to determine if heavy cosmic ray particles injure the brain and eyes. The NASA Ames Research Center was involved with the experiment.

4allmankind
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posted 03-19-2004 06:57 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for 4allmankind   Click Here to Email 4allmankind     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
If the covers were signed within "hours" of takeoff - why are the Apollo 13 covers signed by Mattingly?

Bob M
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posted 03-19-2004 07:52 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I feel pretty safe in saying that they weren't signed just hours before any flight. There was no need to wait until the last minute and I'd think that probably many were signed many days if not many weeks before their flights - probably during breaks in their training or even at their homes.

Part of the problem with Apollo Insurance covers is that so much isn't known or recorded about them and what info is known is not generally available. I hope we here have provided some useful and interesting info about them.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 04-03-2004 05:46 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Bob is correct. The hundreds of "insurance" type covers for each mission were NOT signed by crewmembers within a few hours before their launch to the moon. The crew would usually enter crew quarters about a month before their scheduled launch. In between their training and other astronaut/and crew assigned duties, as time permitted, crewmembers — sometimes individually — would autographed their covers. Sometimes even different pens and inks were used (i.e. the Apollo 11 cachet types) as batches were signed at different times within the few weeks before their moon-bound voyages.

Scott
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posted 04-03-2004 09:56 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Scott   Click Here to Email Scott     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
That's interesting to know. I always had a feeling they weren't signed all at once just before the launch. That's an enormous number of items to sign.

poofacio
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posted 11-19-2006 04:50 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for poofacio   Click Here to Email poofacio     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I get a little confused over insurance covers! I have an Apollo 15 crew signed cover with a letter from Mary Irwin-Vickers stating that it is "an original Apollo 15 insurance cover- created in the event they did not return from the moon"

I assume that makes it an Insurance cover?

Would appreciate an experts advice!

Bob M
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posted 11-20-2006 04:49 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
David's Apollo 15 crew signed cover is certainly a genuine Apollo 15 Insurance cover, especially so having documentation from the widow of Apollo 15 astronaut Jim Irwin. It's the second type with the Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club wording at top and bottom, with the more popular and expensive type having only the round Apollo 15 crew patch/mission emblem cachet and the USAF wings symbol at bottom left and the NASA Astronaut pin symbol at the lower right.

Bob M
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posted 11-21-2006 07:40 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote

If nothing else, these ads and prices (!) show how our hobby has changed and prices have skyrocketed.

The Rand ad was sent to me in 1989 after asking if they had any Apollo 11 crew signed covers available. It is believed that Rand sold a relatively large number of the three types of Apollo 11 Insurance covers then, over 100, and probably most seen nowadays came from that sale. By today's standards, $150 for an Apollo 11 Insurance cover signed by all 3 Apollo 11 astronauts is ridiculous, but back then $150 was a little high for most space covers. Now we see these same Apollo 11 Insurance Covers sell for $3,000 and more. There are stories of collectors not buying an Apollo 11 Insurance Cover from Rand for $150 because the price seemed a little high.

The second ad from Superior offers crew signed Insurance covers (although not identified as such) for Apollos 12 thru 16, with the highest cost of anyone being $49.95. If someone had bought all five, they would have paid a paltry $$164.75 for them. Of course, those five covers nowadays would easily sell for $2,000-$3,000 or more and are not easy to find.

But please don't think that bargains and opportunities like these were common back in the "old days." They weren't and super opportunities like these were extremely rare. I wanted to show these ads mainly to let the present day collector see how our hobby and prices have changed since the 70's and '80's.

micropooz
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posted 11-21-2006 08:16 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for micropooz   Click Here to Email micropooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I agree with Bob M. Even though $150 for an Apollo 11 insurance cover seems ridiculously low today, it seemed steep back then. One of my best friends in the Space Unit talked me into buying one back then (and it took a lot of arm-twisting). Glad I did! The funny thing is that the guy who talked me into it didn't manage to get one!

Rand was also selling the Apollo 15 insurance covers (Type II) for $25 each back then.

divemaster
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posted 02-22-2007 11:54 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Not being a cover collector, is it true that there is really no way to tell the difference between an Apollo 11 insurance cover and a non-insurance cover with the same cachet?

If true, unless it comes with an identifying letter from the astronaut, is there any way to make the differentiation?

Bob M
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posted 02-23-2007 03:16 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Bob M   Click Here to Email Bob M     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by divemaster:
If true, unless it comes with an identifying letter from the astronaut, is there any way to make the differentiation?
Good question. Yes, with the three types of Apollo 11 Insurance covers (Houston/cachet of the astronauts on the moon, Dow-unicover and mission emblem cachet) there is no documentation or anything extra normally added that would differentiate them from non-Insurance covers also signed by the crew and canceled. And to complicate matters, these three types of Apollo 11 cacheted covers, unlike the later Apollo Insurance covers, were also produced and made available, unsigned, in large numbers to collectors.

It's too bad that no documentation was generally added by the astronauts or family members to the covers to positively identify them as "official" Insurance covers, although some may have had documentation added at a later time, but that isn't generally known. It is known that Charles Conrad did add documentation to the back of some of his Apollo 12 Insurance covers and this probably was done by other astronauts on some other Insurance covers (Walter Cunningham, for another, added documentation on the back the Insurance covers he owned and has sold).

Hopefully, many families who owned these Insurance covers did add documentation to the back of the covers providing provenance. And obtaining Apollo 11 Insurance covers directly from the crew members' families is a very sure way to know that the covers are authentic.

divemaster
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posted 02-23-2007 06:00 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, what would be the tell tale signs that a similar cachet would NOT be an insurance cover?

Ken Havekotte
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posted 02-23-2007 06:01 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Just for the record, to my knowledge, Irwin was the first to inscribe and sign many of his insurance covers on the back surface in a special way.

This was done for me way back in the 80s and he even asked me "why?" I wanted to do it as he never did it before on any of his insurance covers.

A few years after that, when asked, Conrad did the same for me (his first in doing so on the special "first-astronaut crew insignia cachet covers" from Apollo 12), Bean also did a few in the same manner, with Haise, Mitchell and Duke throughout the 90s.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 02-23-2007 06:22 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by divemaster:
So, what would be the tell tale signs that a similar cachet would NOT be an insurance cover?
Simply put, first — just know the cachet types and varieties that were used as crew-signed insurance covers.

Secondly — Note the astronaut autograph styles and patters on them. A "true" crew-signed insurance cover would originate from that historic era, just about in most all cases, as they were signed prior to their lunar voyages. Therefore, those "vintage era" signatures contain certain characteristics that were common as they were preparing for their moon trips as astronauts.

From a close study, overall, one can determine or get a good idea of the various different pens and ink colors that were used by crewmembers while in training for a moon shot.

Thirdly — Another is placement of the signatures on the cachet envelope as many, but not all, were signed near or alongside their names as depicted on their mission crew emblem. Others, however, were signed in the middle section of the cachet covers as were most from Apollo 11, 12, 13, and some 16s.

But even some 16s I have were signed in a different area than most, along with a handful of 11s that were signed on the back surface of the envelope cover, but were never postmarked.

divemaster
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posted 02-23-2007 08:45 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I fully understand what to look for in terms signature type, placement, etc. I was just curious about the physical cover itself versus something similar. [postmark, stamp, date?]

If memory serves, that same cachet has appeared at auction as both an insurance and non-insurance. I was just curious as to telling the difference.

As I said, I'm not a cover collector, but this thread caught my attention.

Naturally, through the years, I've also seen some very BAD covers. One never stops learning.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 02-24-2007 05:37 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
All three of the different Apollo 11 cachet covers were, indeed, originally produced as "commercial" covers.

Perhaps the "rarest," which may be a bad choice of words to use here, would apply to Apollo 11's crew mission emblem. They were printed at the request of the NASA Exchange Council at Kennedy Space Center within a few weeks before the scheduled moon shot.

Generally speaking, Kennedy workers would often purchase the emblem covers only "on base," but many of the cachets also found their way into nearby souvenir stores and various other outlets.

To the best of my knowledge, those patch emblem envelopes that were used as insurance covers by the crew and signed, were posted with KSC-machine cancels for the July 16th launch. I don't recall seeing or hearing of any others in that category that were posted with different markings.

The same could also apply to the Dow-Unicover cachet variety — all machine for launch to the moon.

The story changes with the other cachet production, the Manned Spacecraft Center Stamp Club, as Stafford carried/flew in his T-38 from KSC after launch to Houston the majority of those along with the emblem and Dow varieties, all signed by the crew beforehand. It was planned to use most, if not all, of the MSCSC cachet envelopes for postal processing when Armstrong and Aldrin landed/walked on the lunar surface.

Just about all of those covers were machine cancelled from Houston, TX, (4A) on July 20, however, some did in fact contain a "roller hand-cancel" impression while others were "missed" by a circular date during their cancel application.

But I have never seen, and someone please correct me if I am wrong, any of the Apollo 11 insurance covers from the stamp club posted for launch day.

If you would like similar information on how all the other Apollo mission insurance covers were prepared philatelically, just let me know and I'll post here later as time permits.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 02-24-2007 06:00 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Forgot to answer for the above post about the postage stamps that were used for the Apollo 11 insurance covers. It would appear, from the best of my knowledge, that all of 11's insurance covers were affixed with the Scott 1371 issue, the Apollo 8 Earthrise "In he beginning God..." six-cent first-class postage stamp that was first issued in May 1969 from Houston.

divemaster
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posted 02-24-2007 11:11 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
So, the bottom line on the MSCSC A11 covers is if they're canceled in Houston on July 20th with the earthrise stamp, chances are that they're insurance covers. Do I have this right?

Ken Havekotte
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posted 02-25-2007 02:35 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Well, I would have to say "No", because we don't know how many of the MSCSC-cachet varieties were signed by the crew beforehand or afterward for non-insurance purposes.

Perhaps many were signed for MSCSC members, some possibly mailed in to the astronaut office there for signature requests during the later part of 1969, and in-person autograph attempts using the same cachet production throughout 1969-70.

Of course, we do know what kind of pens, inks, etc. were used by the crew on most of their insurance covers — but this doesn't necessarily mean that similar writing pens were not used by the crew in signing for other cover needs and/or requests.

Another point to remember is that the MSC Stamp Club printed 1000s of their cachet covers, all with the same Apollo 8 stamps affixed, in which they were also machine cancelled (same p.o. used) by a nearby Houston postal facility on July 20th.

Another question to wonder about; Just how many of the crew-signed covers, of all varieties, were kept by the crew, families, and friends that may had been a later batch of signed covers not perhaps originally intended for insurance purposes.

Perhaps the later question here could be a "no," but I don't think the answer to it may be an easy one as first believed.

For some good news though, there is probably a better-than-average chance that crew-signed Apollo 11 cachet covers that meet the above requirements may indeed be a genuine insurance cover. To go the extra mile, background information and provenance that is known about a possible cover purchase would help tremendously, especially in having a letter from one of the owning astronauts, a family member, or close friend.

DOX32
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posted 02-25-2007 10:30 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for DOX32   Click Here to Email DOX32     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
Does anyone have a website listing for with all Apollo insurance covers?

I have a few myself, but sadly missing Apollo 11. All three types would be useful.

divemaster
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posted 02-25-2007 05:55 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for divemaster   Click Here to Email divemaster     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I just find the whole Apollo 11 insurance cover discussion(s) to be very interesting. So, I guess the bottom line is consider the source when buying a purported Apollo 11 insurance cover. Then again, that holds true throughout out hobby.

yorksteve
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posted 02-26-2007 04:08 AM     Click Here to See the Profile for yorksteve   Click Here to Email yorksteve     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I too would like to know more about the background to the various insurance covers - in particular the numbers produced/signed for each mission. I have insurance covers from 11,12 and 15, and hope one day to find the rest...

Tom
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posted 02-26-2007 02:58 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Tom   Click Here to Email Tom     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
As long as we're on this topic, what was the reason that the Apollo 17 crew decided not to produce any insurance covers for the final lunar mission?

micropooz
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posted 03-15-2007 05:18 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for micropooz   Click Here to Email micropooz     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by divemaster:
I was just curious about the physical cover itself versus something similar. [postmark, stamp, date?]
Well, my wings cover has the Antarctic Treaty issue on it, and that seems to be the most prolific stamp on Apollo 15 insurance covers.

However, the Bicentennial Issue came out July 4 of 1971 and was in-fact the most recent stamp issued at the time of the Apollo 15 launch. And a good patriotic theme for a space cover. So it is entirely appropriate, just not seen as often.

Ken Havekotte
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posted 03-15-2007 07:42 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for Ken Havekotte   Click Here to Email Ken Havekotte     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
It was Scott himself that selected to use both postage stamp issues — the Antarctic Treaty and American Revolution Bicenntial — on their crew insurance covers.

Why? Because simply put, the Bicentennial stamp depicted the same colors — red, white, and blue — as the crew's emblem patch and the Antarctic topic represented an "exploration" factor in addition to the stamps' blue and white colors.

scrpien
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Posts: 53
From: Arizona
Registered: Jun 2011

posted 07-25-2011 03:43 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for scrpien   Click Here to Email scrpien     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
quote:
Originally posted by poofacio:
I have an Apollo 15 crew signed cover with a letter from Mary Irwin-Vickers stating that it is "an original Apollo 15 insurance cover - created in the event they did not return from the moon".
I also have one of these covers with the same letter. My letter is not really a letter at all but seems to have been printed on some type of photo paper and it is hard to tell whether it is just a copy of a signed letter or if Mrs. Irwin actually hand-signed it.

Was wondering about others' letter as in the above cited message. Is it the same type of thing?

spaced out
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Posts: 2597
From: Paris, France
Registered: Aug 2003

posted 02-27-2012 02:06 PM     Click Here to See the Profile for spaced out   Click Here to Email spaced out     Edit/Delete Message   Reply w/Quote
I'm pleased to announce a new addition to my Space Flown Collectibles website, covering the topic of Apollo Insurance Covers.

I realize of course that these covers were not flown and thus don't strictly fit in the theme of the site, but they are so closely related to the issue of flown covers that I felt it worth making an exception in this case.

The article is written by Howard C. Weinberger, and is based in part on articles and research by Richard Jurek, Bob McLeod, and Ken Havekotte.

The page also includes a short section dealing with the story of the life insurance policies of the Apollo astronauts - since contrary to popular belief they did actually have life insurance policies - written by myself and Rich Jurek.

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